Bright Cities


Protecting communities from neurotoxic chemicals.

Designed by Healthy Babies Bright Futures, the Bright Cities program works with local governments to reduce their community’s exposures to "brain drain" chemicals. Neurotoxic chemicals are interfering with the ability of our children to learn and thrive. The Bright Cities program is designed to lower the levels of these chemicals in air, water, food, soil and the products we use every day. In time, lower exposures will result in babies with a lower incidence of learning disabilities, attention deficit disorders, behavior problems and low birth weight.

What Does It mean to be a bright city?

Your city makes improvements in the areas right for your community:

Built environment, housing & facilities
Built environment, housing & facilities
Built environment, housing & facilities
Example actions may include: restricting the use of toxic pesticides on lawn, parks and pets, implementing integrated pest management in public housing, replacing lead painted windows and requiring training for landlords.
Public Health
Public Health
Public Health
Example actions may include: increasing screening of blood lead levels in pregnant women and infants and bolstering policies to reduce exposures to mercury and PCBs in locally caught fish and shellfish.
Air Quality
Air Quality
Air Quality
Example actions may include: reducing emissions through no-idle policies, diesel engine retrofits and other common sense programs in high traffic areas. Additional actions include reducing emissions from wood stoves, including the requirement of EPA certified models.
Built environment, housing, & facilities
Water Quality
Water Quality
Example actions may include: reducing lead, arsenic, and perchlorate levels in drinking water. Additionally, replacing all lead water distribution system mains and service lines.
Procurement
Procurement
Procurement
Example actions may include: avoiding the purchase of products containing neurotoxic chemicals including mercury, flame retardants, pesticides, phthalates, lead, and arsenic. Additionally, setting performance measures to quantify reductions in exposures to these chemicals.
Early Childhood Education
Early Childhood Education
Early Childhood Education
Example actions may include: keeping dangerous chemicals off the menu and out of the water supply in childcare centers along with educating childcare providers on hand-washing, dust reduction and other practices that reduce exposures.
Built environment, housing, & facilities
Food
Food
Example actions may include: testing soil in community gardens and playgrounds located on public land and remediate as needed. Additionally, promoting breast feeding and food grown without harmful pesticides.
Community Leadership
Community Leadership
Community Leadership
Example actions may include: conducting city-wide audit to identify sources and hot spots along with improving communications to at-risk populations (perhaps through health centers).

How It Works

Get started as a Beacon City and work with Healthy Babies Bright Futures to transform into a Bright City.

Healthy Babies Bright Futures works with Beacon Cities to assess their particular community’s needs and risks. Together, we then engage the public to develop the most effective strategies to lower exposures. Beacon Cities transform into a Bright City as they implement the strategies designed to protect their residents. Cost-effective and meaningful improvements will come through public policy and programs, advocacy, and public engagement. By strengthening a community in the target improvement areas, we reduce women and children’s exposure to dangerous neurotoxic chemicals that cause developmental delays in our nation’s children. The Bright Cities program aims to protect the long term health of this and future generations.

Updates

Keep up with what's happening at Bright Cities!

Introducing Bright Cities
Introducing Bright Cities

I’m so pleased to announce that the first four cities have embarked on the Health Babies Bright Futures (HBBF) Bright Cities program. Dearborn, Minneapolis, Salt Lake City and Seattle have all committed to undertake the Beacon Cities assessment process, the first step in a Bright City.

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A Bright Future
A Bright Future

Great work is being done with HBBF's first four Beacon Cities: Dearborn, Minneapolis, Salt Lake City, and Seattle.

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Why Parents Should Vote Local on Election Day
Why Parents Should Vote Local on Election Day

In most major cities, less than 15% of voters turn out to vote in mayoral elections. Without our vote, how can we ensure our local officials support policies that protect our babies?

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Are you a member of a local government interested in making your city brighter?

How We Can Help Your City

Participating local governments collaborate with HBBF to develop and implement a Bright Cities action plan that is unique to each community. Our years of experience in local government and the public health sector, coupled with our allied network of partner organizations, will ensure a plan that fits the needs of your residents. Bright Cities can offer assistance in the areas of strategic planning, public policy and programs, data collection and performance measures, connecting with the media, and finding the partners needed to help your community successfully address these challenges.

Please provide the requested info. Our Program Director will get in touch with you soon.