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Furniture & Appliances

Appliances

Outdoor grill

Use
Drip pans and foil

Grilled meat can contain toxins called PAHs, formed when meat fat burns and when meat is charred. You can get the flavor with fewer toxins by using a drip pan and foil to capture drips and reduce flare-ups. And keep your grill clean – scrape the charred buildup off before cooking next.

Don't Use
Charred meat

Charred meat contains toxins called PAHs. To cut your exposures, choose lean meat, trim fat before cooking, marinate before grilling, and partially pre-cook in the microwave if possible. Boiling, stewing and microwaving are alternate ways to cook that also cut your PAH load.

Range hood

Use
Range hood

Cooking can significantly increase levels of toxins called PAHs in your home's air. If you cook on a hoodless range, you can use a window fan to vent cooking fumes out of your home when the weather allows it. A more effective (but also more expensive) solution: install a range hood.

Don't Use
Hoodless range

Making your home safe for pregnancy and a new baby should include finding a way to vent your kitchen while cooking. A window fan and a new range hood are both options.

Woodstoves and fireplace inserts

Use
EPA-certified woodstoves and fireplace inserts

EPA-certified woodstoves and fireplace inserts emit 2 to 20 times less pollution than a standard fireplace or old woodstove. Choose a model with a hangtag saying it meets 2020 clean air standards. Learn more at EPA's Burn Wise webpage.

Don't Use
Old woodstoves

Any time you burn wood, chemicals and toxic particles can build up both inside and outside the home. Wood smoke affects everyone, but for pregnant women and young children, dangers include reduced IQ and higher risk of ADHD. New, certified woodstoves and inserts are a better choice.